grandma phyllis’s cinnamon rolls

Remember these delicious sweet rolls? Remember how a few of you asked for the recipe about a month ago? Well, since I know you Midwesterners are getting huge snow storm this weekend, I thought I would share this recipe as it’s the perfect thing to bake when you’re stuck inside your house all day. You can’t rush sweet rolls so make sure you have plenty of time to dedicate to these delicious breakfast-y treats.

My Grandma Phyllis makes these rolls almost every time we are at her house. It seems that she always has a pan of fresh rolls and if she doesn’t, it’s guaranteed that she has some in the freezer just waiting for us to come and visit. Before I moved back to Washington I asked her if she would teach me how to make her famous sweet rolls. I’m still no expert, but at least I learned from one.

This recipe makes two 9 x 13 pans of rolls, which is a lot of rolls, but it can be easily halved.

So here goes, I apologize for the long directions, but I think they’re helpful, especially if you’re a bread making novice.

Grandma Phyllis’s Sweet Roll Dough:

1/2 cup warm water (I would say about 115 degrees)

2 packages dry yeast (not rapid rise)

1-1/2 cup lukewarm milk, scalded and cooled to lukewarm

1/2 cup sugar

2 tsp. salt

2 eggs

1/2 cup butter

7 to 7-1/2 cups unbleached all purpose flour

Directions:

  • Scald milk in glass measuring cup.
  • Dissolve yeast in water and let it stand.
  • While milk is cooling, add sugar, salt and butter to your mixer’s bowl. The mixer should be fitted with the dough hook attachment. Add milk after it is cooled (it doesn’t have to be all the way cool, just not steaming hot). Add eggs and 1-2 cups flour to beat in.
  • Add yeast mixture to mixing bowl when the mixture is lukewarm.
  • Add flour one cup at a time. You can use your stand mixer for another couple cups of flour, but then stir in flour until too stiff to stir.
  • Turn onto floured board or countertop and knead in the rest of the flour. Amount of flour varies, so go by how dough feels, usually not more than 7 cups, sometimes 6-1/2. The dough should be softer than for regular bread.
  • When dough is right consistency and smooth from kneading, place in a large, clean, greased or oiled bowl. Cover with towel or lid. Let it rise in a warm place until it has doubled in size, about an hour and a half.
  • Turn out onto floured board or countertop (again) and knead until approximately the original size and no large bubbles remain. Put back in the bowl and let rise until double (again).
  • Knead down again. Shape into any sweet rolls you’d like…

Here are your sweet roll options:

Classic Cinnamon Rolls (this is the amount for one pan of cinnamon rolls, remember the recipe above will make 2 pans)

2 Tbsp softened butter

1/2 cup sugar mixed with 2 tsp. cinnamon

  • Set oven to 350 degrees.
  • Roll dough with rolling pin into 15″ x 9″ oblong. Get out your ruler and measure it, because that’s what Grandma Phyllis would do. Plus, your rolls will be much more uniform if you measure it out instead of eyeballing.
  • Spread the dough with the softened butter and sprinkle with the cinnamon/sugar mixture. Make sure to get the butter and cinnamon/sugar all the way to the edges of the dough.
  • Roll up the dough tightly, the wide side should be parallel to you. Seal by pinching the edge to the dough. Stretch dough as you work to get it as even as possible- you don’t want one side to be thicker than the other.
  • Cut long roll into 1″ thick slices. Place in greased 9 x 13 pan. Don’t forget to grease the sides. You should have 4 rows of 3 rolls per row. (The ones I made that are pictured above are smaller than they should be because I didn’t measure my dough.) The rolls won’t be touching just yet.
  • Cover and let rise until double.  They will typically rise a bit faster this time.
  • Bake in 350 degree oven for 25-30 minutes. They should be light to medium brown when done.
  • When done place baking rack or platter over baking pan and invert, turning rolls out onto baking rack or platter. If you’re using a rack it helps to put wax paper or parchment paper over the rack so it isn’t so messy. You can bake these and then frost them with powdered sugar frosting.

Caramel Rolls (these are the ones my Grandma always makes)

1/3 to 1/2 cup butter (depending on how much caramel you like)

1/2 to 2/3 cup brown sugar

1 Tbsp. light colored corn syrup or 1 Tbsp cream

1/2 cup chopped pecan halves (optional)

  • Follow instructions for the cinnamon rolls above but do not place them in the baking pan.
  • Grease the sides of your 9 x 13 pan. Melt the butter, brown sugar and corn syrup/cream in the pan. Make sure to mix these ingredients well as they’re melting to form a caramel. Then sprinkle with nuts, if using.
  • Place the cut roll dough over the caramel mixture and let rise until double.
  • Bake as directed above- 350 degree oven for 25-30 minutes. Invert immediately on baking rack or platter. Make sure to leave the pan upside down for about 30-60 seconds so all of the caramel-y goodness drips out of the pan onto the rolls.

I realize there are a lot of steps, so I hope it all makes sense. They don’t take as much time as you think, it’s a lot of “hurry up and wait.” Yeast breads are a little tricky to make, but they are so delicious when they’re finished, that they’re worth every bit of it. Let me know if you have any questions or if something is unclear.

And definitely let me know if you end up making these sweet rolls, I’d love to hear how they turn out!

And because they’re a lack of photos in this post, I’ll leave you with this photo of the little one practicing her claps on Valentine’s Day.

Advertisements

2 responses to “grandma phyllis’s cinnamon rolls

  1. Cindy

    Love the last photo of that yummy Sweet Roll !!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow Me on Pinterest

Archives

%d bloggers like this: